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Corrective Jaw Surgery

Corrective Jaw Surgery

Oral surgery to correct problems with the jaw is known as orthognathic surgery. Jaw issues can result from birth defects, changes due to growth, or injury or trauma to the face. While orthodontics can correct bite problems when only the teeth are involved, oral surgery may be required when repositioning of the jaw is necessary to correct the issue. If you suffer from any of the following concerns, orthognathic surgery may be a consideration:

  • Difficulty chewing, biting or swallowing
  • Problems with opening and closing your mouth, or with speaking
  • Persistent jaw or temporomandibular joint pain
  • Clenching or grinding of teeth causing excessive wear to the teeth
  • Inability to make the lips meet without straining
  • Un-proportional facial appearance or protruding jaw
  • Malocclusion, open, or incorrect bite
  • Recessive lower jaw and chin
  • Habitual mouth breathing
  • Sleep apnea and breathing problems
  • Facial injury or trauma

Most jaw surgeries are performed completely in the mouth, so no facial scars are visible. The oral surgeon makes cuts in the jawbone and then moves them to the correct position. Once the jaw is correctly aligned, screws and bone plates are placed to secure the jaw into the new position. Sometimes it may be necessary to add extra bone to the jaw from your hip, leg, or rib.

Orthognathic surgery is performed by an oral and maxillofacial surgeon usually in a hospital setting. Recovery time from jaw surgery takes three to six weeks. Your general or family dentist should be able to refer you to a skilled oral surgeon for a consultation and examination to determine a treatment plan. Jaw surgery can improve not only your facial appearance, but also chewing, speaking and breathing functions.

Contact one of our dental offices Ryde, Campsie, Kogarah, and Haymarket

Tartar is the Enemy

Tartar is the Enemy

It’s hard to miss with advertisements and visits to the dentist that tartar is something you want to avoid for good oral health. But do you know what this substance is, how to keep from getting it, and what to do if tartar does develop?

What’s so bad about tartar?

Even if you brush and floss regularly, it’s impossible to get rid of all of the bacteria in your mouth. Bacteria and food residue combine to form plaque on your teeth. If left to thrive, plaque attacks your teeth and gums. It causes decay, gum inflammation, and will harden into tartar if not removed before it has the chance.

What does it do to my teeth and gums?

Tartar buildup makes it more difficult to brush and floss well, and tartar along your gums may lead to gum disease. Mild gum disease, or gingivitis, is often caused by plaque and tartar on your teeth. It can usually be reversed with careful dental hygiene. If left untreated, it will progress into periodontitis. This more serious gum disease can damage the bones and tissue that support your teeth, increasing your risk of tooth loss. It may also cause infections that contribute to heart disease and other health problems.

How can I control tartar?

Here are some ways to prevent tartar formation:

  • Brush at least twice daily long enough to thoroughly clean every tooth and all of your gums. Consider using an electric toothbrush, which may be more effective for plaque removal.
  • Use tartar-control fluoride toothpaste. It is formulated to help prevent tartar formation, and the fluoride can repair damage to your teeth that may have already begun.
  • Floss every day to reach the areas that brushing cannot.
  • Eat a healthy diet low in sugars and starches, and limit snacks between meals. Drink plenty of water to help rinse away plaque and bacteria.
  • Don’t smoke because tobacco use has been shown to increase tartar buildup.

How do I get rid of it?

A professional cleaning is the only way to successfully remove tartar. See your dentist every six months for checkups and cleanings.

Contact one of our dental offices Ryde, Campsie, Kogarah, and Haymarket

Focusing on Wisdom Teeth Removal

Focusing on Wisdom Teeth Removal

It is estimated that ten million impacted wisdom teeth are removed every year. This means that you or someone you know has probably experienced this type of oral surgery. Even so, the thought of wisdom tooth extraction strikes fear and apprehension in many people. Knowing more about why it’s necessary and the procedure itself may alleviate your concerns.

Wisdom teeth are the furthest teeth in the back of your mouth, and come in later than all of your other teeth. Sometimes they don’t erupt at all, becoming stuck or impacted in your gums. Even if they do come in naturally, they may not fit in your mouth properly with the rest of your teeth.

There are some common issues that necessitate the removal of wisdom teeth. These include:

  • Impaction – impacted teeth may grow sideways and even damage your jawbone.
  • Infection – teeth that partially erupt can cause openings in your gums that allow bacteria inside, causing sometimes serious infections.
  • Tumors and cysts – complications like tumors and cysts can develop around impacted wisdom teeth, sometimes damaging to the gums and jaw.
  • Pressure – impacted teeth can pressure the surrounding teeth, causing abnormal growth, tooth decay, and orthodontic problems.

The best way to avoid these types of issues is to have your wisdom teeth surgically removed. Many dentists recommend removing them even before you’re experiencing problems, so that you avoid problems later. Your dentist may refer you to an oral surgeon. After a consultation and examination including X-rays, a treatment plan will be determined.

Wisdom tooth extraction is an outpatient procedure in the surgeon’s office, using some level of anesthesia. Sometimes only local anesthesia is required, while some cases benefit from deeper levels of anesthesia for your comfort and health. Afterwards, you will experience some discomfort and should follow the doctor’s advice for care. Ice, pain medications, a soft diet, and rest are advised. A follow-up visit will be scheduled to monitor your healing. Typically, you will be back to normal in a few days and won’t have to worry about your wisdom teeth again.

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Treating Receding Gums With Oral Surgery

Treating Receding Gums With Oral Surgery

While minor gum recession can be treated by your dentist with deep cleaning and antibiotics, serious gum recession can only be treated with oral surgery. A loss of bone and gum pockets that are very deep require gum surgery to address the pain and damage left by acute gum recession.

Three treatments are used primarily in the treatment of serious gum recession, in order of invasiveness: pocket depth reduction, regeneration, and soft tissue graft. Pocket depth reduction involves a deep cleaning of the affected area. The periodontist folds the gum tissue back and utilizes tooth scaling and root planing to remove any tartar and plaque built up around the tooth. Once the gum pockets are clean, the surgeon pulls the gum tissue gently around the tooth, eliminating the deep pockets altogether or significantly reducing their depth.

Regeneration utilizes a similar treatment to pocket depth reduction, but it also addresses any bone loss that occurred due to acute gum recession. In this process, a regenerative agent such as graft tissue, membranes or tissue stimulating proteins is added to the affected area. The gum tissue is then tucked into place and stitched down. Over time, the regenerative agent will work to rebuild lost bone and tissue, leaving healthy and thriving tissue behind.

The most common soft tissue graft is taken from the patient’s own mouth, either by removing tissue from the roof of the mouth or from the gum tissue near the affected tooth. The healthy gum tissue is placed in the affected area, over the exposed tooth root, protecting it from infection and damage.

To prevent the need for oral surgery to address your receding gums, have good oral hygiene habits. Brush, floss and see your dentist twice a year for checkups and professional cleanings. Talk to your dentist if you have any other questions about how to reverse or prevent gum recession.

Contact one of our dental offices Ryde, Campsie, Kogarah, and Haymarket

What is a Dental Emergency?

What is a Dental Emergency?

Sometimes an injury or tooth pain can occur suddenly, and immediate dental care may be required. It’s not always obvious when a problem needs emergency care, but some dental emergencies do need to be treated quickly to avoid infections or permanent damage. Here’s a guide to situations that are usually considered dental emergencies.

  • Cracked or broken tooth – contact your dentist immediately. Rinse your mouth with water and hold a cold compress to the affected area until you can get to your dentist’s office.
  • Excessive bleeding with lip or tongue bite – clean the area and use a cold compress. Go to the emergency room if the bleeding is severe or won’t stop.
  • Jaw injury – if you think you may have broken your jaw, apply a cold pack and immediately to your dentist’s office or the emergency room.
  • Knocked out tooth –rinse the root of the lost tooth if it’s dirty. Do not scrub or removed any tissue left on the tooth. Try reinserting the tooth into its socket, but if that isn’t successful, see your dentist right away. Placing the lost tooth in milk may help preserve the tooth until you can get professional help.
  • Loose tooth – see your dentist immediately if one of your teeth is loosened. Take over-the-counter pain reliever if needed, and apply a cold compress.
  • Lost crown or filling – place the crown or filling in a safe place and contact your dentist. To decrease sensitivity, you may apply clove oil and dental cement available at your drugstore, but only if you’ve gotten approval from your dentist.
  • Severe or sudden toothache – rinse your mouth with warm water and gently floss around the tooth. Contact your dentist if your toothache persists.
  • Swelling – painful swelling in your mouth may indicate an abscess, which is an infected area of pus that can become serious. See your dentist as soon as possible, and try rinsing your mouth with saltwater in the meantime.

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Sedation Dentistry: Benefitting Patients and Dentists Alike

Sedation Dentistry: Benefitting Patients and Dentists Alike

Sedation dentistry is rapidly becoming an extremely popular choice for patients, offering them the best oral care available while providing them with a comfortable, stress-free experience. Benefits exist for both the patient and the dentist, especially for certain patient groups, who may only be able to obtain dental care they need while under some kind of sedation.
Sedation dentistry uses various medications to help the patient relax while undergoing a dental procedure. The sedation allows the patient to be free of fear, anxiety and stress, and in some cases, to have a reduced memory of the treatment itself. This allows for a much more favorable experience, especially when undergoing invasive, extensive or multiple-visit treatments such as extractions, gum surgery, root canals, or some cosmetic dentistry procedures.

Because sedation dentistry is specifically designed to reduce or to alleviate fear and anxiety, the patient is more relaxed during the dental visit. Dentists working on tense or anxious patients are often aware of the problem and have to work with greater care. The removal of this patient tension allows the dentist to work more quickly and surely, leading to a shorter appointment and a more positive experience for both doctor and patient.

Dentists require cooperation from the patient in order to proceed with any dental procedure. Patients who are very young, have special needs, an acute gag reflex, or movement control issues can be extremely challenging for dentists to administer the necessary care. Sedation dentistry can solve this problem, allowing for patients to be cooperative and still, providing the safest, best experience for patient and doctor alike.

Patients who have positive experiences at the dentist are more likely to return for regular dental check-ups. These patients have overall better dental hygiene and tend to have fewer serious dental issues over time. Patients who have good oral care will feel better about their smiles and will be more confident and comfortable throughout the day.

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Locations

Village Dental – Haymarket
Shop 118, 8 Quay Street
Haymarket NSW 2000
P. 02 9281 0007
Hours & Directions

Village Dental – Kogarah
Shop 5, 23-26 Station Street
Kogarah NSW 2217
P. 02 9281 0007
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Village Dental – Ryde
Shop 1/35-37 Devlin Street
Ryde, NSW 2112
P. 02 9281 0007
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Village Dental – Campsie
Shop 3, 17-21 Campsie St.
Campsie NSW 2194, Australia
P. 02 9281 0007
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Connect With Us

Our dentists at Village Dental Campsie in Canterbury-Bankstown provide necessary dental care to Belmore, Lakemba, Belfield, Croydon, Ashbury, Earlwood, Kingsgrove area. At Village Dental Ryde in Ryde provide dental care to Melrose Park, Rhodes, Putney, West Ryde, Marsfield, Epping, Ermington, Concord West, North Strathfield, Gladesville, Top Ryde, Wentworth Point, Denistone and the surrounding area. At Village Dental Haymarket in Central Sydney CBD provide dental care to Ultimo, Pyrmont, Town Hall, Wynyard, Surry Hills, Darlinghurst, Redfern, Alexandria, Glebe, Forest Lodge, Camperdown, Paddington, Double Bay, Vaucluse and the surrounding area and at Village Dental Kogarah in St George provide dental care to Bexley, Rockdale, Banksia, Brighton-Le-Sands, Monterey, Ramsgate, Sans Souci, Dolls Point, Carss Park, Blakehurst, Allawah, Hurstville, Penshurst and the surrounding area. Additional Languages Spoken by our dentists: Nepali, Indian / Hindi, Arabic, Chinese (Mandarin), Vietnamese.

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